Press

For A Pigeon and a Boy with Jewish Theatre Collaborative (2013)

by AL Adams for Oregon ArtsWatch:
Meshulam (a warm, boisterous Matthew D. Pavik) and Liora (a coldly competent Jamie M. Rea) demonstrate two sides of another core character trait: the tendency to overbear in others’ affairs....
by Bob Hicks for Oregon ArtsWatch:
A family friend, the genial and generous Meshulam (Matthew Pavik) and his construction-business daughter and partner, Tirza (Chantal DeGroat), who helps Yair renovate a home of his own, complete the web of characters who tie the tales together.


For The Mousetrap with Lakewood Theatre (2013)

by Leela Ginelle for PQ Monthly:
…The most colorful of these are Christopher Wren (a fantastic Samuel Summer), who’s described often as “a queer young man” and Paravicini (the very fun Matt Pavik), a larger than life, possibly fraudulent, Italian businessman.
Summer and Pavik help fill up the first act’s stretches of meandering exposition with their verve and their sometimes daring choices.

…The show’s most lively moments came during interactions between Summer and Wolman, which were quirky and evoked humanity at its most prickly, or Pavik and Caleb Adderly, who played Sergeant Trotter, in which the suspicious Paravacini displayed a brazen caginess with the officer more mysterious than anything involving the play’s offstage crimes.


For Measure for Measure with NW Classical (2012)

by Holly Johnson for The Oregonian
...In a variety of roles, particularly a hilariously sinister executioner, Matt Pavik is a massive sight gag, with his large body and booming voice, yet he's so natural onstage and so true to Shakespeare's lines that we follow him with interest.


For Candide with Portland Opera (2012)

by James Bash for Oregon Music News:
... Matt Pavik, Shawn Rogers, and Nicholas Nelson displayed impeccable comic timing in several roles.


For The Unseen with The Quick & Dirty Art Project (2011)

by Marty Hughley for The Oregonian:
... Even more than freedom, though, it’s that sense of the grand design that the prisoners yearn for. Yet their path to salvation runs not through any faith or cosmological fancy, but through their tormentor, a guard they call Smash (played by Matthew D. Pavik as a sort of accidental monster), and an episode of extravagantly twisted mercy. ...
by portlandprose at The Portland Gospel:
.. As the occasionally-topically-named Smash Matthew Pavik acentuated his sadistic murderer’s cultured, considerate details. Pavik’s melodious voice caressed words and his songs of angry cursing blasted without growling. The Penguin if Gilbert and Sullivan had written an operetta about Frank Miller’s Batman Returns. ... 


For Superior Donuts at Artists Repertory Theatre (2011)

by Bob Hicks at Art Scatter:
... In a nine-cast show, every role ... offers the reward of at least one of those “moments” that actors cherish: the little spotlight when it’s their turn to shine. This can come even in the smallest of roles. Matthew D. Pavik, for instance, who plays the almost speechless new Russian immigrant Kiril, has an extraordinarily touching small scene of sympathy with the bag lady (Vana O’Brien), a scene that makes both roles worth playing and is carried out by both with exceptional skill. ...
by Barry Johnson at Arts Dispatch:
... And the very large (in this company at least) Matthew D. Pavik starts out as a sight joke, and then actually becomes the sweetest character on the stage. ...

For Wild Space A Go Go with Wild Space Productions (2010)

in Just Out:
... Wild Space A Go Go features a cast of ten local favorites, including Lisa Marie Harrison, Rebecca Teran, and the devilishly handsome Matthew Pavik. ...